The Dangers behind Lead Paint | Tri Span Environmental Safety

As a homeowner, you do everything possible to protect your family. Some of the dangers to their well-being are easy to spot. Others, however, are not so obvious. One of these is lead paint. Once a common household item, it’s now recognized as a leading cause of developmental disorders in children. Regrettably, most of the public is unaware of the dangers these toxins pose to growing minds and bodies.

Some of the more common symptoms of lead poisoning include:

  • Headaches.
  • Upset stomach.
  • Nausea and vomiting.
  • Unusual fatigue.
  • Irritability.
As lead poisoning becomes more severe, its effects worsen as well. Over time, it can lead to behavioral issues, learning disabilities, seizures, and even premature death.

The good news is that safeguarding your family from these dangers requires only following a few basic safety guidelines, including:

  • Wiping down flat surfaces like window sills on a regular basis using a moistened rag or paper towel. Be sure to dispose of the cleaning cloth afterwards.
  • Keep carpets and upholstery vacuumed to remove loose paint dust. If possible, use a vacuum with a built-in HEPA filter.
  • Damp mop floors at least once a week to control dust.
  • If you see loose paint chips, then pick them up using gloves or and dispose of them in the trash.
  • Have a home safety professional check the interior of your home and the surrounding soil for led-based hazards. Tri Span Environmental is the leading firm of this type in both Orange County and Los Angeles County.
  • Have your children’s blood levels checked once every 12 months between one and six years of age for elevated lead levels. This is especially important if you live in an older home or if the child has a relative or playmate who has suffered from lead exposure.
  • Have your children wash their hands frequently to reduce contact with dust.
  • Avoid using any lead-containing products in your home.
  • If you burn candles, then be wary of ones made in third world countries; they may contain high levels of lead.

These guidelines are especially important to keep in mind if your home was built before 1978, the year that led-based paint was removed from the market. My following these simple steps, you can help to ensure that your children grow up safe, strong, and lead-free.

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